By Chad Magee

Each day I wake up and have a cup of coffee while I read the news and check my email (articles about early morning email be damned!).

Inevitably, I end up reading the Medium newsletter — curated just for me!

In the newsletter, I find articles about setting goals and building habits, most of which rotate between the same few topics and tactics. One of the most common writing topics I see is creating a daily writing habit.

Articles on this topic explain why it’s important, how it’s made that person successful, and how to create this habit for yourself.

But, why not take a different approach?

Sure, a daily writing habit helps and obviously worked for that person, but, you’re not that person.

You probably spend eight hours a day, five days a week, at job and are trying to get this writing thing started on the side. You still want to do things with family and friends. You still want to watch Altered Carbon on Netflix, so you’re not left out of the water cooler discussion.

So, I propose that you DON’T create a daily writing habit. At least, not right now.

Photo by Jazmin Quaynor on Unsplash

Start by simply setting aside one day per week — preferably, one where you have nothing else going on — and write for one hour.

Use my outlining guide during the week, so that you can capture those ideas you have when you’re supposed to be working.

Then, when you sit down for your one hour, write like crazy!

The reason this will work is that you’re not putting as much pressure on yourself.

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How hard is it to find one hour on a Saturday or Sunday morning? Or one hour on a Tuesday night?

Could you maybe turn off the TV for ONE hour ONE night per week?

Furthermore, you’ll start writing and find yourself still typing long after one hour has passed. Soon, you’ll have penned the next great American (Canadian?) novel!

Ok, you’re not writing a novel in one hour. But, there is no minimum requirement for length on Medium. Chances are you’ll have finished two or more posts, which is two or more than you currently have.

Feel free to increase the time you set aside each week or month. If you find the day you initially chose isn’t working out, there are six others from which you can choose.

Be flexible. The goal is to write. Doing it one day per week accomplishes that goal.

And just think, if you write for four hours, two days a week, that’s eight hours of writing, which greater than the seven hours you get from one hour per day.

Give it a try and let me know how this works out for you @QuasiChad!

Source: Writing Cooperative 

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